Sports :: How to Win at Betting: Sports Gambling Winning Percentage, What You Need to Know

In the question above, it would be much better to be a 55-percent handicapper if you were playing 150 games a month, as opposed to a 60-percent handicapper playing one game a day. A winning percentage of 55-percent sure doesn’t sound as sexy as a 60-percent handicapper, but if your volume of plays is high enough, it can certainly be much more profitable.

Making it more difficult for sports bettors is that some sports services will claim to have won 200 units in a particular sport, but don’t mention that they release 10- or 20-unit plays, along with several 100-unit “locks” at the end of the year if things aren’t going so well and they need something to base next year’s advertising on.. At the end of the month, the 55-percent handicapper would have gone 83-67 for a gain of 9.3 units, while the 60-percent handicapper would have gone 18-12 for a profit of 4.8 units, so the 55-percent handicapper has made nearly twice as much.

With baseball season coming back in about 4 months, many sports gamblers will be seeing ads from different sports services claiming winning percentages of 65-percent for baseball, and that’s entirely possibly, but what the services aren’t saying is that the majority of their selections were favorites of -200 or more, turning that 65-percent handicapping into a losing proposition.

The 55-percent handicapper is using what is commonly referred to as the Wal-Mart Approach, which is to have a lot of volume with the expectation of grinding out a small profit. And as is the case with the Arkansas-based giant, many times this will be more profitable than being extremely selective and doing a small amount of volume, even if the mark-up is higher.

For the bettors that do their own handicapping, however, units won is really the only thing you should be concerned with, as that ultimately is going to translate into the bottom line. If somebody were to ask you if you would rather be a 60-percent handicapper or a 55-percent handicapper, which would you choose? The obvious answer is that it’s better to be a 60-percent handicapper, but that isn’t necessarily true.

The only statistic that sports bettors should be concerned with is units won, which is the amount of profit, or loss, they have over time, and not worry nearly as much about winning percentage

New documents show Pete Rose bet on baseball as a player, ESPN reports

Postal Inspection Service in October 1989. “I need to maintain that.

Dowd said his team had sought the records in order to prove Rose bet on the sport while a player.

“Since we submitted the application earlier this year, we committed to MLB that we would not comment on specific matters relating to reinstatement,” the statement read. Most of the bets were for about $2,000.

Pete Rose’s long insistence that he never gambled on baseball while playing the game may be unraveling, after ESPN unearthed documents it says shows he bet on the Cincinnati Reds while a player-manager in the last year of his illustrious career.

Rose, the sport’s all-time leader with 4,256 hits, has been banned from the sport since 1989. This closes the door,” said John Dowd, the former federal prosecutor who led MLB’s 1989 investigation.

- John Dowd, MLB investigator. Therefore at this point, it’s not appropriate to comment on any specifics.”

Major League Baseball has historically reserved its harshest punishment for players who gamble on the sport, claiming such wagers affect baseball’s integrity – even if a player such as Rose bet on his own team to win.

The documents obtained by ESPN’s “Outside the Lines” are copies of pages from a notebook seized from the home of former Rose associate Michael Bertolini during a raid by the U.S. The sports network said the papers’ authenticity has been verified by two people who took part in the raid, which was part of an unrelated mail fraud probe. “We tried to get them. But the newly surfaced documents could spell an end to the 74-year-old legend’s Cooperstown aspirations.

This closes the door,” said John Dowd, the former federal prosecutor

“This does it. That meeting likely will come sometime after the All-Star break. The actual notebook has remained under court-ordered seal for 26 years and is currently stored in the National Archives’ New York office.

Rose issued a statement to ESPN through his lawyer, Raymond Genco.

“We knew that [Bertolini] recorded the bets, and that he bet himself, but we never had his records,” Dowd told ESPN. To be sure, I’m eager to sit down with [MLB commissioner Rob] Manfred to address my entire history — the good and the bad — and my long personal journey since baseball. Rose, who would certainly be in the Hall of Fame if not for his ban, has long lobbied to be allowed back into the sport. He refused to give them to us.”

In the five months covered by the notebook, Rose allegedly placed at least one bet on baseball 30 times, as well as placing wagers on other sports, ESPN reported. For the next 15 years, he insisted he never gambled, then in 2004 admitted he had but only as a manager

Betting on baseball cards – Jul. 28, 2006

It boils down to a couple of simple principles — how many there are and what kind of condition the card is in.

Up until the late 1980s and early 1990s, collectors were living in a golden age, says Madec – returns of 20 percent in just six months were not unheard of. Flooding the market with multiple versions of new cards, the manufacturers drove down card values.

Hope for future?

The market has been bouncing back, particularly vintage cards, those that date backs 25 years or more. “The vintage market is still the place for people to get involved purely from an investment standpoint,” says Kelnhofer. (See the most valuable cards.)

“It just got too out of hand,” says Madec, who runs his own firm, Andy Madec Sports Cards Inc. In 1996, the year after Ripken broke Lou Gehrig’s record for number of most consecutive games played, a card in mint condition that had not been professionally appraised would have sold for $90.

But many in the industry, like Madec, who is currently attending the National Sports Collectors Convention, is certain that is there is a future for this enduring hobby, despite its setbacks in recent years. “The questions are still out there as to whether it will have an impact or not.”

Cards dating back to the turn of the 20th century that were produced as promotional items for ice cream, candy and tobacco companies are some of the hottest cards on the market right now, according to collectors.

Earlier this year, the Major League Baseball Players Association lent their assistance, cutting in half the number of licenses it offers to card manufacturers in an effort to rid the glut of new cards on the market.

Rookie cards of players like Mickey Mantle, who typified the golden era of baseball, are always in high demand among older collectors.

Currently underway in Anaheim, Calif., the four-day event will not only be a place for collectors to haggle over the value of their Lou Gehrigs and Jackie Robinsons, there’s bound to be a few collectors who reflect on how the hobby took a nosedive during the 1990s.

In fact, the fabled Honus Wagner card, which was produced by the Sweet Caporal Cigarette Company in 1909, is currently the most expensive card in existence, worth a cool $1.265 million. “There’s no guarantee it will happen,” says Dickler. “Investors just need to hear it’s safe to go back in.”

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But there is a lot of fickleness too, says Scott Kelnhofer, editor of Card Trade, the monthly trade journal for the sports collection industry

Andy Madec, a dealer based in Camarillo, Calif., remembers that time vividly.

Best baseball books . “This market has incredible potential,” he says. What’s hot now

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Dealers like Stephen Dickler, who runs SD Trading, located just outside of Philadelphia, says moves such as this could work, but it’s too early to tell. But that was until the card companies tried to get in on the fun. But with Ripken’s achievement faded from the minds of collectors, that same ungraded card would only fetch $40 today.

NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) — Once a year, baseball-card collectors gather for the granddaddy of all sports collectible conventions – the National Sports Collectors Convention.

Most valuable cards

Then there are the cards from the 1970s and 1980s, which predate the card explosion, that some experts like Kelnhofer say could experience the next wave of popularity.

Even though the hobby struggles to bring young collectors into the fold, there have been some promising signs for baseball card collecting as of late.

“It’s a tricky thing,” Kelnhofer says. “There’s always buyers and sellers for that material.”

And in June, Major League Baseball and the players’ association teamed up with card manufacturers Topps and Upper Deck to launch the first ever National Baseball Card Day, giving out 500,000 card packs at hobby shops and retailers nationwide in an effort to promote the hobby.

The hobby looks like it has rebounded from the doldrums of the 90s, but is there money to be made in collecting Aarons and Ruths?

Take Cal Ripken Jr.’s 1982 Topps rookie card. “It turned people off.”

Even in good times, collecting is a tough hobby